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Savannah Historic District
Savannah Historic District/ Riverfront
Savannah Historic District
Savannah Historic District

When the weather is too beautiful to sit inside, Savannah has some of the best outdoor patios and decks to keep you outside enjoying the sunshine. From iconic balconies and riverside eateries to spots you can have crab for lunch and dessert with the alligators, Savannah has the perfect outdoor restaurant for you. So, grab the family and the family dog, and snag a seat at one (or all) of the best outdoor dining spots in Savannah.

Tubby’s on River Street
If you’ve ever walked along River Street, you’ve probably seen Tubby’s iconic balcony packed with locals and travelers alike. Here, you can enjoy fresh-caught seafood and the river breeze while watching the cargo ships cruise by. For a meal with a view, Tubby’s is the ideal spot for lunch or dinner.
Float over to Tubby’s

Vic’s on the River
Looking for a romantic date night or just an upscale eatery? Vic’s is a great choice for those looking to experience refined southern cuisine and fresh, local seafood. While reservations for indoor seating at Vic’s restored cotton warehouse are available (and encouraged), the outdoor patio overlooking the river is on a first-come, first-serve basis.
Enjoy patio dining at Vic’s

Vinnie Van Go Go’s
Vinnie Van Go Go’s is one of Savannah’s most popular pizza joints, and for good reason. Vinnie Van’s award-winning pizza can be ordered whole or by the absolutely enormous slice. Most of the restaurant’s seating is located outdoors in City Market, making it a great place to people-watch while enjoying a slice.
Grab a slice at Vinnie’s

Crab Shack – Tybee Island
Tybee Island’s Original Crab Shack prides itself on being not just a restaurant, but a destination. Formerly a fish camp, the space now seats over 700 people on the marshes of northern Tybee Island. After downing massive platters of seafood and BBQ, visitors can stretch their legs at the exotic bird apiary or feed the alligators in the Gator Lagoon. The Original Crab Shack is family friendly, and a great way to end the day after visiting Tybee’s beaches.
Eat and explore at the Shack

Treylor Park
Treylor Park offers seasonal cocktails, craft beer and a unique take on American cuisine in a fun, lively atmosphere. Guests can dine indoors or outside at their courtyard bar and beer garden. Wherever you choose to sit, just don’t miss your chance to try their famous PB&J wings, made with peach jelly and peanut-pecan butter.
Dine and drink at the Park

Ready to grab a bite on the best patios, decks and balconies in Savannah? Book your stay today!

Mrs. Wilkes' Dining Room

A line gathers each morning at 107 West Jones Street. At 11 o’clock, the doors of 107 open and the lunch crowd finds a seat at one of the large tables-for-ten shared by strangers. Tabletops are crowded with platters of fried chicken and cornbread dressing, sweet potato souffle, black-eyed peas, okra gumbo, corn muffins, and biscuits. The menu changes daily so regulars can have something different every day. Stop by and enjoy the special pleasure of a meal shared with neighbors and strangers.

While Savannah is home to some old haunts and truly terrifying tales, its cemeteries are as beautiful as they are historic. If you’re planning on traveling to Savannah this fall, be sure to visit one of the city’s municipal cemeteries to enjoy their relaxing scenery and rich history.

Bonaventure Cemetery
Just three miles from Downtown Savannah along Wilmington River, Bonaventure Cemetery is one of the oldest and most well-known cemeteries in Georgia. Spanning 160 acres, it’s one of the most photographed cemeteries in the world, and with one stroll past beautiful greenery, centuries-old oak trees and intricate statuary, you’ll know why. Featured on the cover of John Berendt’s “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil,” the cemetery is home to other notable gravesites include American songwriter Johnny Mercer, poet Conrad Aiken, and little Gracie Watson, a six-year-old girl who died of pneumonia and was commemorated with a picturesque, true-to-life statue.

Open to the public year-round from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM, the Bonaventure Historical Society offers free guided tours on the second weekend of every month or self-guided tours through a mobile app. If desired, other tour companies offer paid tours that can be scheduled any day of the week.
Have an adventure in Bonaventure Cemetery

Colonial Park Cemetery
If you venture to the heart of Savannah’s historic district, you’ll find yourself in the middle of Colonial Park Cemetery. The city’s oldest municipal cemetery, dating back to 1750, this six-acre park is home to over 9,000 graves and a thousand more tales of the past. During the American Civil War, several hundred Union soldiers occupying Savannah took shelter here, turning graves into campsites and vandalizing the headstones in the night. The cemetery is also known for its rear wall, where dozens of headstones were hung to make room for city park pathways. Notable gravesites include early Georgia governors, nearly 700 victims of Savannah’s 1820 Yellow Fever epidemic and that of Button Gwinnett who was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence.

Colonial Park Cemetery is open to pedestrians every day of the week from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM March-November and 8:00 to 5:00 PM the rest of the year. Admission is free, but a number of private companies offer paid tours in and around the cemetery. Ghost tours are also available, though these don’t typically enter the cemetery itself.
Step into Colonial Park Cemetery’s past

Laurel Grove Cemeteries
On the west side of Savannah lies Laurel Grove Cemetery, featuring 160 acres that tell a history that haunts us today. Previously a rice field owned by Springfield Plantation, the cemetery was segregated by race, with whites resting in the north section, and slaves and freed black persons resting in the south. The 67-acre northern section is well-known for its beautiful Victorian statuary, mausoleums and ironwork. Notable graves include that of Girl Scout Founder Juliette Gordon Low, “Waving Girl” Florence Martus, and a number of Civil War graves. The southern section initially only spanned 15 acres, but has since been expanded to 90. It is one of the nation’s oldest black cemeteries still in use and was not as well-preserved and maintained as its northern counterpart. This was true up until the mid 1900s, when preservation efforts by local activist W.W. Law set a standard for how the cemetery was to be treated. His remains were interred here after his death in 2002. Other notable gravesites include Reverend Andrew Bryan, founder of the First African Baptist Church, and Jane Deveaux, who conducted secret schooling for black children before it was legal to do so.

The Laurel Grove Cemetery is open to visitors (and leashed pets) seven days a week from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. The site is a stop for a number of paid tours through private companies, if you’re interested in learning more about the cemeteries and the people interred there.
Take stroll through history

Ready to explore historic and hauntingly beautiful Savannah? Book your stay today!

Mrs. Wilkes' Dining Room

A line gathers each morning at 107 West Jones Street. At 11 o’clock, the doors of 107 open and the lunch crowd finds a seat at one of the large tables-for-ten shared by strangers. Tabletops are crowded with platters of fried chicken and cornbread dressing, sweet potato souffle, black-eyed peas, okra gumbo, corn muffins, and biscuits. The menu changes daily so regulars can have something different every day. Stop by and enjoy the special pleasure of a meal shared with neighbors and strangers.

Ghouls, ghosts and good, clean family fun. Experience Halloween in one of the most haunted cities in the world. Over the centuries, Savannah has borne witness to both the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, leaving behind a history steeped in mystery, tragedy, death and catastrophe. Whether you believe in the paranormal or not, you cannot deny the eerie energy and abundance of reported spiritual happenings around the area. However, if you’d like to leave the ghosts on the other side, this beautiful Southern city is full of family friendly activities guaranteed to raise your spirits.

Bonaventure Cemetery
“Where death and beauty meet.” As one of the most famous, beautiful and hauntingly historic cemeteries in Georgia, Bonaventure Cemetery is a must visit. The scenic, southern-gothic 100-acre park offers free self-guided tours, guided tours on the second weekend of every month and access to 150+ years of spooky folklore. Follow the old tree-lined paths to the graves of famous people, like Conrad Aiken and Johnny Mercer, and experience the romantic chill that has inspired writers, poets, photographers and filmmakers alike.
Visit the Southern-gothic park

Wag-O-Ween
A costume contest for both kids and dogs, Wag-O-Ween is a family and pet friendly event everyone will enjoy. Held in Downtown Savannah October 23-24, this annual trick-or-treat fundraiser attracts over 1,000 participants with over 100 businesses giving out dog treats and goodies. Join in the fun for a Happy Howl-o-ween.
Trick-or-Treat fun

Escape Savannah
If you’re looking to immerse yourself in spirits, Escape the Haunted Room offers murder, mystery and mind-bending riddles. Enter the eerie Victorian room of a child and sift through a long-dead daughter’s belongings. As you discover the tragedy that befell her, you must also quickly escape the wrath of her spiteful and cruel mother before you suffer a similar fate.
Escape the Haunted Room

Colonial Park Cemetery
In the heart of Savannah’s Historic District, you’ll find a cemetery as old as our country itself. Established in 1750 during the British colonization, Colonial Park Cemetery has a haunted history riddled with tragedy, fear, destruction and desecration. Not only a graveyard, the cemetery was a popular site for dueling to resolve conflict, including the famous duel between Button Gwinnett and Lachlan McIntosh. Haunted by the ghost of Rene Rondelier, a troubled behemoth of a man covered in a layer of fur, the grounds also feature graves of nearly 700 yellow fever victims and tombstones desecrated by Sherman’s Union Army.
Nightly Spirits await

Graveface Museum of Oddities
Love all things weird and eccentric? Experience the bizarre side of Halloween with a visit to Graveface. Full of oddities and curiosities, museum goers can peruse macabre taxidermies, haunted dolls, alien artifacts and paraphernalia from cults and true crime events.
Visit Graveface

Sorrel-Weed House Ghost Tours and Paranormal Investigations
Featured on The Travel Channel’s “Most Terrifying Places in America,” Sorrel-Weed House is believed to be one of the most actively haunted locations in America. Tour the history and architecture of the 183-year-old Greek Revival-style mansion by day, and contact the spirits within at night. Supervised by an experienced paranormal investigator, explore the mansion and carriage house with your very own ghost-hunting equipment to make contact with the other side.
Explore Sorrel-Weed House

Savannah Underground
An immersive theatrical horror performance, Savannah Underground is often described as “one of the scariest things to do in Historic Savannah.” Enjoy three historical horror-fantasy reenactments in a 360-degree set and try not to be spooked by the haunting scene unfolding all around you.
Go Underground

Ready to explore the spiritual underbelly of hauntingly beautiful Savannah? Book your stay today!

Mrs. Wilkes' Dining Room

A line gathers each morning at 107 West Jones Street. At 11 o’clock, the doors of 107 open and the lunch crowd finds a seat at one of the large tables-for-ten shared by strangers. Tabletops are crowded with platters of fried chicken and cornbread dressing, sweet potato souffle, black-eyed peas, okra gumbo, corn muffins, and biscuits. The menu changes daily so regulars can have something different every day. Stop by and enjoy the special pleasure of a meal shared with neighbors and strangers.

Settled against the beautiful Savannah River, River Street is one of the many highlights to visit in Savannah. The historic area is full of boutiques, galleries, restaurants, bars, and much more, all within a one mile stretch of cobblestone. Taking in all River Street has to offer on one trip would be a daunting task, so we’re giving you our picks for the perfect day-long adventure down River Street! This list will feature a diverse selection of activities and services (including food and cold drinks!) all designed to create what is sure to be your favorite part of your Savannah vacation.

Let’s begin our River street adventure!

 

  1. Wake up at the Homewood Suites

As the sun rises, begin your day with a hot cup of coffee and enjoy the sunrise and beautiful view of the Savannah River from your Homewood Suites room. The views offered by the Homewood Suites are some of the best in the area and pair perfectly with a cup of coffee.

 

  1. Breakfast: A taste of the south

Get your morning started strong with a breakfast at Huey’s Southern Café. Huey’s has brought the taste of New Orleans to Savannah with Big Easy staples like jambalaya, red beans and rice, and beignets. Their Cajun brunch menu is unlike anything you’ve ever tasted, so be sure to fill up with as much as you can. Enjoy their French-Quarter inspired outdoor seating area that provides a beautiful view of the riverfront and Savannah River

 

  1. Time to shop

The plethora of galleries and shops that adorn River street are a driving force behind its southern charm. From small boutiques, souvenir t-shirt shops, and pop up merchandise, River Street offers something for everyone and can help you pick out gifts for those back home. Be sure to check out the River Street Market Place, a large outdoor covered market that features local stores and artists. If you’re looking for something unique, try out the Mad Hatter for your new favorite hat.

 

  1. Lunchtime!

After all this walking and shopping, you’re bound to need some food. River street offers plenty of options for a mid-day bite, including lots of seafood. The Shrimp Factory and Tubby’s seafood offer ocean fare, and Bernie’s Oyster House offers a unique setting in a converted warehouse form the 1800s.

 

  1. Set sail

After lunch, grab some tickets and hop on board the Savannah Riverboat for an afternoon sightseeing tour. The 90-minute cruise is narrated by an experienced host who will tell you all about the port and shipping industry, and how much it means to Savannah. The cruise will finish with a trip to Old Fort Jackson, which is a must-see for any history buff. The boat offers a selection of food and drink in case you shopped through lunch.

 

  1. History and culture

In between shops, be sure to take in all of the art, monuments, and historic information offered on River Street. Begin at the Visitor Center and the adjacent African American monument. As you walk along River Street you will be taken through decades of Savannah history, including a cotton brokerage site and the yachting cauldron from the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. As boats cruise by, make sure to see the Waving Girl Statue and read up on a local legend. Be sure to end the evening at the Graveface museum, a museum that collects and celebrates all things unusual, macabre, unique, and mysterious.

 

  1. Grab a drink

River Street is full of pubs that are the perfect stop for a pre-dinner drink. From upscale wine bars to sports bars, River street can satisfy any taste.

 

  1. Dinner

You’ll be glad it’s time for another meal, because you’ll certainly want to try another one of River Street’s many restaurants. If you’re in the mood for some fine dining, look no further than Vic’s on the River, located in a beautiful old cotton warehouse overlooking the Savannah River, or try The Naked Dog or Lizzy’s Burger Bar and Grill for a more laid-back experience.

 

  1. See the spooky sights

Savannah is known for its connection to the supernatural and ghost stories. Ghosts and Gravestones will take you on a historic trip though haunted Savannah and fill you in on all of the ghost sightings, stories, and rumors. Book a ticket only if you dare however, the tours only start after the sun goes down.

 

  1. Dessert time

No day is complete without a sweet treat at the end, and River Street has plenty of options. Be sure to hit Savannah’s Candy Kitchen; once you walk in you’ll think you entered the chocolate factory. Savannah’s Candy Kitchen is constantly churning out some of the most decadent treats you’ll ever eat, including the staple of the south, the praline. The picky candy eaters can choose from a mountain of candy favorites.

 

  11. Nightcap

For a perfect end to the night, head up to rtb! On the rooftop of the Homewood Suites for a perfectly-crafted nightcap. Enjoy your favorite beverage with an overlook of the Savannah River and skyline.

 

It’s impossible to fit all of River Street in a single day, but this guideline should get you on a great start. Feel free to add in your own stops and make the experience exactly what you want.

Enjoy River Street!

Mrs. Wilkes' Dining Room

A line gathers each morning at 107 West Jones Street. At 11 o’clock, the doors of 107 open and the lunch crowd finds a seat at one of the large tables-for-ten shared by strangers. Tabletops are crowded with platters of fried chicken and cornbread dressing, sweet potato souffle, black-eyed peas, okra gumbo, corn muffins, and biscuits. The menu changes daily so regulars can have something different every day. Stop by and enjoy the special pleasure of a meal shared with neighbors and strangers.

It’s no secret that Savannah has a haunted history and is, appropriately, full of some of the best ghost tours in the south. But underneath the spiritual craze lies a delightful lineup of fall festivals full of light-hearted, family friendly fun. Experience the season’s charm and southern hospitality in this historical setting and cozy up to Savannah this fall.

Savannah Jazz Festival, September 23-26
Welcome the cool weather and the smooth sounds of the Savannah Jazz Festival. Home to many influential jazz legends such as Johnny Mercer, Ben Tucker, James Moody and Teddy Adams, Savannah attracts artists from all walks of life and levels of talent. Grab the family and head to Forsyth Park to experience all that live jazz has to offer.

Phil in the Park, October 9
Home to the city’s most famous and picturesque fountain, Forsyth Park is the perfect place for October picnics, proposals, weddings and free events like “Phil the Park.” On October 9, tote your lawn chairs, blankets, picnics and loved ones to the park to enjoy free performances by Savannah Philharmonic & Philharmonic Chorus as they perform feel-good favorites, songs from the silver screen and the popular “1812 Overture” complete with live firing cannons.

Publix Women’s Half Marathon & 5K, October 9
Grab your girlfriends and experience Savannah on foot as you run through the beautiful oak-lined streets shaded by Spanish moss. Start at Forsyth Park, pass by Forest Gump’s bench, weave through the historic homes and quaint city squares to finish in front of the beautiful Forsyth Park fountain.

Savannah Film Festival, October 23-30
No one presents a show quite like the Savannah College of Art and Design; Just ask any of the star-studded 63,000+ attendees. The annual festival celebrates cinematic creativity from both emerging students, award-winning filmmakers, directors, actors and producers. So sit back, relax and enjoy film screenings, workshops, panels and lectures.

Savannah Speed Classic, October 21-24
If you feel the need for speed, come fill your tanks at the Savannah Speed Classic. Thought to be the birthplace of Grand Prix racing, Savannah unrolls the red carpet and proudly welcomes the racing world onto its coastal, winding course. Enjoy the adrenaline of the crowd, revving engines and sleek car designs as we celebrate all things automotive.

Savannah Pride Festival, October 28-30
Celebrate diversity, pride and love on the cobblestone streets of downtown Savannah. The festivities begin on Thursday with the Masquerade, marches into Friday with the Pride Parade and erupts with music, performances, food and drink on Saturday at the Pride Festival in Ellis Square.

Rock ‘n’ Roll Savannah, November 6-7
Rumored to be the most beautiful course in the Rock ‘n’ Roll series circuit, Savannah’s Rock ‘n’ Roll marathon offers scenic views of manicured parks, Victorian homes and architectural sites on a flat, fast course. Experience the warm, southern charm as local bystanders cheer you across the Forsyth Park finish line.

Are you ready to experience Savannah in the fall? Book your stay today!

Mrs. Wilkes' Dining Room

A line gathers each morning at 107 West Jones Street. At 11 o’clock, the doors of 107 open and the lunch crowd finds a seat at one of the large tables-for-ten shared by strangers. Tabletops are crowded with platters of fried chicken and cornbread dressing, sweet potato souffle, black-eyed peas, okra gumbo, corn muffins, and biscuits. The menu changes daily so regulars can have something different every day. Stop by and enjoy the special pleasure of a meal shared with neighbors and strangers.

 

Fall in Savannah is one of the most beautiful times of the year. The changing of leaves, cooling temperatures, and strolling along the beautiful and sometimes haunted historic sites are just a few of the glorious reasons to pack your bag and head down to the southern hostess city once the summer heat dissipates. Now you may be thinking, “Did she just say haunted?” The answer is “Yes!” With the rich history of Savannah comes some local spots with great food, drinks, and ghosts. I have mapped out five of the spookiest pubs below so you can add some paranormal hunting to your vacation to-do list.

Moon River Brewing Company

Let’s start with a classic haunt, Moon River Brewing Company. While the charming exterior and serene beer garden may seem calm, looks are deceiving. Inside the building, patrons and employees report that they have been pushed but no one was there, seen bottles suddenly thrown by an unseen force, heard laughter coming from empty hallways, and run into not so friendly ghost “Toby” when they’ve ventured into the basement. These mischievous spirits have even attracted The Travel Channel’s Ghost Adventures and the SyFy Channel’s Ghost Hunters to come to Savannah and document the paranormal activity.

Tondee’s Tavern

Now that we’ve made it through Moon River, the next four stops should be a breeze! Let’s venture on to Tondee’s Tavern where you can grab a drink, a meal, and maybe a ghost sighting. Built in the 1850’s, the building that houses Tondee’s was originally a bank and during the civil war it was used as the headquarters for a Union General. If you’re feeling particularly brave, hop on one of the local ghost tours and enter another basement where you may encounter the ghost of a soldier!

17Hundred90 Inn & Restaurant

We’ve made it halfway through our spooky journey! Let’s look at 17Hundred90 where you can see not one, but three ghosts! Grab a drink at the bar and you might get a chance to see Thaddeus, a friendly young spirit who may leave pennies on the bar. The staff, however, experience a more frightening spirit who likes to toss pots and pans around the kitchen. You can also check into room 204 and meet Anna. Anna was said to be caught in a nasty love triangle and threw herself from a third floor window. It is believed that she stays in room 204, nudging guests, moving items, and tugging on the bed covers.

Pour Larry’s

You guys still with me on our hauntingly fun adventure? We’ve made it too far to back out now! Let’s take a peek at our 4th spot, Pour Larry’s. Make your way downstairs to experience this City Market basement bar and enjoy some live music, drinks, and possibly some busted glass thrown at employees by an unseen hand! Our ghostly friends seem to love to roam basements, so it’s no surprise that this bar is the perfect spot for some paranormal activity.

Six Pence Pub

Now that we’ve been though some truly terrifying stops, it’s time to grab a nice cold brew to calm your nerves and brace yourselves for our final stop. Six Pence Pub, a quaint and one of a kind British Pub is so picturesque you’d never guess that the employees may experience pots and pans suddenly flying off the counters, sudden drops in temperature, chairs being turned around at random by invisible guests, and light bulbs bursting. It’s believed that the spirits here tend to haunt the employees more than the patrons but stop in and chat with them for some ghostly tales.

You guys did it! We made it through five of the spookiest bars in Savannah. These are just a starting point, as there are many other bars, restaurants, and inns that house some friendly and not so friendly spirits. So the next time you come to Stay in Savannah on a crisp fall evening, make sure venture out and see if you can find one of the mischievous ghouls from our spooky pub adventure. Happy Hauntings!

Mrs. Wilkes' Dining Room

A line gathers each morning at 107 West Jones Street. At 11 o’clock, the doors of 107 open and the lunch crowd finds a seat at one of the large tables-for-ten shared by strangers. Tabletops are crowded with platters of fried chicken and cornbread dressing, sweet potato souffle, black-eyed peas, okra gumbo, corn muffins, and biscuits. The menu changes daily so regulars can have something different every day. Stop by and enjoy the special pleasure of a meal shared with neighbors and strangers.

Savannah’s Historic District is packed with beautiful historic churches, and you’d be doing yourself a disservice if you failed to visit at least a few of them. We explored five of these pieces of history back in January, now let’s take a look at five more historic churches that you should tour when you visit the Hostess City.

Trinity United Methodist Church

Built in 1848, Trinity United Methodist Church has the distinction of being the oldest Methodist church in Savannah. Since 1884, the church as been recognized as the Mother Church of Savannah Methodism. Trinity United Methodist Church features a sanctuary of Corinthian architecture, and the building itself reflects a Greek Revival Style. The church is sits on Telfair Square at 225 West President Street.

Lutheran Church of The Ascension

On Wright Square at 120 Bull Street is where you’ll find the Lutheran Church of The Ascension. This church combines both Gothic and Norman architecture and boasts stained-glass windows that show scenes from the life of Christ. A marble altar depicts Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper. Completed in the late 1870s, the church was used as a hospital for the wounded during the Civil War.

Wesley Monumental United Methodist Church

The Wesley Monumental United Methodist Church was built in 1868 and features a Gothic architectural style that was patterned after Nieuwe Kerk – or Queen’s Kirk, the most-visited church in Amsterdam. The church honors the founders of the Methodist denomination, John and Charles Wesley. Its memorial windows are made of European-stained glass, and one window, aptly named the Wesley Window, faces the pulpit and features the busts of the two brothers. Find the church at 429 Abercorn Street on Calhoun Square.

Saint John’s Episcopal Church

Located at 325 Bull Street on Madison Square, Saint John’s Episcopal Church serves as a parish of the Episcopal Diocese of Georgia. The church was founded in 1841 and is recognizable for its harmonizing chimes that fill the air on the hour every day, as well as its stained-glass windows that portray scenes from the New Testament.

Unitarian Universalist Church

Established in 1851, the Unitarian Universalist Church was where “Jingle Bells” was composed. James Pierpont is credited with writing the classic Christmas in 1852. Located at 311 East Harris Street on Troup Square, the Unitarian Universalist Church stands out with its Gothic style features that make the building resemble a castle. The church was closed before the Civil War and purchased by freed slaves.

There are no shortage of historic churches to explore during your stay in Savannah. Start planning your visit now!

Mrs. Wilkes' Dining Room

A line gathers each morning at 107 West Jones Street. At 11 o’clock, the doors of 107 open and the lunch crowd finds a seat at one of the large tables-for-ten shared by strangers. Tabletops are crowded with platters of fried chicken and cornbread dressing, sweet potato souffle, black-eyed peas, okra gumbo, corn muffins, and biscuits. The menu changes daily so regulars can have something different every day. Stop by and enjoy the special pleasure of a meal shared with neighbors and strangers.

There’s no time quite like springtime in Savannah. The warmer weather, the endless activities, the gorgeous views – there are countless reasons to head for this gem on the coast. This spring, don’t miss these quintessential ways to thaw out in the Hostess City.

Sunny weather

Spring is a goldmine for great weather in Savannah. The heat and humidity haven’t fully geared up, and the rain has begun to clear. Temperatures remain in the low- to mid-70s – ideal for taking strolls through the city’s unique squares and perusing the local shops.

Flowers in bloom

Though Savannah is known for its year-round Spanish moss and magnolia trees, flowers are the stars of the city in the springtime. Dogwoods, camellias, and azaleas all make their grand entrance starting in late-February, and downtown’s squares explode with color. Make your way to Bonaventure Cemetery for a display of blooms you won’t want to miss, or take a walk down Jones Street to see spectacular colors on display.

Patio season

Savannah takes its patio life very seriously. This is a city that takes it slow and makes the most of its nearly year-round good weather. So, grabbing a cold beverage and pulling up a chair to take in the lovely view and the vibrant street life has become a favorite pastime of locals and tourists alike. If you love a good sip in the shade as much as we do, check out these locations to sample patio life perfection.

Tubby’s Seafood

River Street offers some of the best views in the city, and Tubby’s Seafood gives you front-row seats. Watch the cargo ships float by, take in a great view of the Savannah Bridge and watch for a jumping fish or two.

Moon River Brewing Co.

In the heart of Bay Street, Moon River boast the largest beer garden in downtown Savannah. The outdoor bar has tons of seating, and – in spite of the fact that the building is haunted – the restaurant stays busy. Order a craft-brewed beer and pull up a chair to people watch the folks from all walks of life as they explore the city.

Zunzi’s

Located right off Drayton Street, this pint-sized lunch spot is a local favorite. Featuring South African-inspired fare, Zunzi’s is the home of The Godfather, recently voted “Best Sandwich in Georgia” by People.com. Grab a table outside and sit under a rainbow umbrella as you chow down on any of their unique sandwiches while you watch the sparrows flit through the trees.

Treylor Park

Treylor Park’s motto is “quality over quantity.” Featuring bespoke cocktails, craft beer and locally sourced ingredients, this vintage-chic space is within walking distance of the river and offers great music and lots of energy. Enjoy a drink amid the lush outdoor seating area surrounded by sable palms.

Starland Yard      

For a family-friendly atmosphere and a bright, colorful venue, you can’t beat Starland Yard. This all-outdoor space features a rotating list of food trucks. Grab a seat at one of the many tables, or throw a blanket down on the manicured lawn and eat picnic style. With games, music, and a vast array of food options, Starland Yard is an ideal way to enjoy the Savannah sunshine.

Food, festivals, and your feet in the sand

Spring marks the start of festival season in Savannah, and the fun gears up quickly. From   March 26 – April 11, don’t miss the Savannah Music Festival. This 17-day-long event offers an impressive array of artists and musical styles, from bluegrass, to punk rock, to classical.

Another great way to spend the afternoon is at the Savannah College of Art and Design Sidewalk Arts Festival. Each year, SCAD students create masterpieces in chalk on the sidewalks of Forsyth Park. Visitors can also see the art of tableaux vivants (“living pictures”), in which actors and models silently depict scenes as if in a photo.

SCAD students also bring their talents to the beach with the annual Sand Arts Festival on Tybee Island. Staff, alumni and students all create magnificent and wild creations in the sand to win the coveted SCAD Spirit Award.

Ready to spend spring in the Hostess City? Book your stay in Savannah today!

Mrs. Wilkes' Dining Room

A line gathers each morning at 107 West Jones Street. At 11 o’clock, the doors of 107 open and the lunch crowd finds a seat at one of the large tables-for-ten shared by strangers. Tabletops are crowded with platters of fried chicken and cornbread dressing, sweet potato souffle, black-eyed peas, okra gumbo, corn muffins, and biscuits. The menu changes daily so regulars can have something different every day. Stop by and enjoy the special pleasure of a meal shared with neighbors and strangers.

Savannah’s St. Patrick’s Day celebration is big. No, like REALLY big. More than 500,000 people are expected to visit for the festivities this year. According to Fodor’s, it’s one of the largest St. Patrick’s Day celebrations in the world. There’s an annual parade, vendors and live music on River Street, green fountains, green beer, and green pride throughout the city. If you haven’t been to Savannah for St. Patrick’s Day, it’s an absolute bucket list experience.

If your partying days are mostly in the past, not to worry! There are so many family-friendly, non-alcohol-related activities to enjoy. Whether you’re interested in learning more about your Irish heritage, or just hoping for a bit of the luck o’ the Irish, here are a few of our favorite ways to experience St. Patrick’s Day in Savannah.

Celtic Cross Ceremony

Emmet Park

March 8, 1 p.m.

This moving, annual ceremony, attended by the city’s Irish Catholic community along with their family and friends, honors the city’s Irish heritage. With live bagpiping and meaningful speeches in front of the Celtic Cross in Emmet Park, this traditional ceremony and reception is the perfect way to understand what St. Patrick’s Day is all about.

Celtic Woman

Johnny Mercer Theatre

March 10, 6 p.m.

This incredible, all-female group of musicians have kept the Celtic tradition of telling stories through song. Tara McNeil plays the fiddle and Irish harp while soloists Mairéad Carlin, Éabha McMahon and Megan Walsh join in song. Joined by pipers, drummers, and stepdancers, Celtic Women is a magical, live experience that celebrates Ireland’s rich musical heritage.

Irish Heritage Society Dance

Alee Temple

March 13, 8 p.m.

Irish dancers of all ages have been showing off their moves at this dance, which has been held for more than 40 years. Kick off the celebrations of the Irish community at Alee Temple with live music, dancing, raffles, and more!

Tybee Irish Heritage Celebration Parade

Tybee City Hall

March 14, 3 p.m.

If you’d rather avoid the chaos of Savannah’s parade, we recommend checking out this family-friendly event a few days prior. With floats, marchers, and bands, you’ll enjoy being part of the sea of green at this seaside celebration on Tybee Island.

Still deciding where to stay? We recommend the Homewood Suites by Hilton Savannah Historic District/Riverfront. From the rooftop bar and cabanas, you can look down at all the festivities happening on River Street or retreat to your relaxing oasis, where every room includes a full kitchen. Book your stay in Savannah today!

Mrs. Wilkes' Dining Room

A line gathers each morning at 107 West Jones Street. At 11 o’clock, the doors of 107 open and the lunch crowd finds a seat at one of the large tables-for-ten shared by strangers. Tabletops are crowded with platters of fried chicken and cornbread dressing, sweet potato souffle, black-eyed peas, okra gumbo, corn muffins, and biscuits. The menu changes daily so regulars can have something different every day. Stop by and enjoy the special pleasure of a meal shared with neighbors and strangers.

When you go to a bar in Savannah’s Historic District, you’ll soon discover a unique perk. Instead of being forced to finish your drink before you leave to head to another bar, you can instead take it with you thanks to Savannah’s unique to-go cup zone – as long as the beverage is held in a plastic container. Now that you’re aware of that little treat, let’s look at some of the city’s best downtown bars.

The Rail Pub

The Rail Pub has been a local mainstay since it opened its doors back in 1890. Located on Franklin Square, the pub’s name stems from the workers who would gather in said square as they waited to work on the railroad. Today, the laid-back, no frills bar serves as a go-to watering hole for both locals and tourists alike.

Stafford’s Public House

One of Savannah’s newer bars, Stafford’s Public House, opened in March of 2017, combines the atmospheres of a dive bar and a dance club into one, resulting in one of the more entertaining experiences you’ll have in the Historic District. Enjoy a drink or two with new friends you’re bound to meet, and then dance the night away. You’ll find Stafford’s Public House off the beaten path at 306 West Upper Factors Walk.

Artillery

Located in a restored armory in which the Georgia Hussars cavalry unit once stored their artillery, this speakeasy boasts an extensive bourbon, cocktail, and wine list. Artillery’s interior harkens back to the eclecticism and romanticism of the 19th century, so you’re greeted with an air of sophistication as soon as you walk through the door. Find Artillery at 307 Bull Street, between Liberty and West Harris streets. Make sure you try the Bull & Matador cocktail!

O’Connell’s Irish Pub

If you’re interested in a genuine Irish pub on the smaller side in the Hostess City, then you’ll want to go to 42 Drayton Street. O’Connell’s Irish Pub prides itself on its authenticity, with its walls being covered in all kinds of Irish memorabilia like sports jerseys. Get a pour of Guinness and you’ll feel as though you’re in the heart of Ireland!

Circa 1875

Circa 1875 is a French restaurant that houses a gastropub on one side and a dining room on the other side. The gastropub features an ambience that reflects 18th century décor, from the doors, windows, moldings, complex tile floors, and Mahogany bar. And, of course, refreshing drinks to pair with your hors d’oeuvres. Circa 1875 is located on the corner of Whitaker and Broughton streets.

Abe’s on Lincoln

As if the name wasn’t clear enough, this Abraham Lincoln-themed bar is situated at 17 Lincoln Street. Enjoy craft beers and cocktails in the rustic-esque tavern, or find space outside on the patio. If you’re looking for spot with a dive bar ambience, then look no further than Abe’s on Lincoln.

What are you waiting for? Book your stay in Savannah and start visiting the city’s best watering holes!

Mrs. Wilkes' Dining Room

A line gathers each morning at 107 West Jones Street. At 11 o’clock, the doors of 107 open and the lunch crowd finds a seat at one of the large tables-for-ten shared by strangers. Tabletops are crowded with platters of fried chicken and cornbread dressing, sweet potato souffle, black-eyed peas, okra gumbo, corn muffins, and biscuits. The menu changes daily so regulars can have something different every day. Stop by and enjoy the special pleasure of a meal shared with neighbors and strangers.

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